Trooper Criticizes Missouri Highway Patrol During His Testimony - The Missourian: Emissourian

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Trooper Criticizes Missouri Highway Patrol During His Testimony

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Posted: Saturday, October 12, 2013 2:00 pm | Updated: 2:58 pm, Thu Dec 26, 2013.

One of the state troopers who shot Jeffrey Weinhaus, the anti-government blogger who was found guilty this past week on several felony charges, lashed out at his employer during his testimony Thursday.

Sgt. Henry Folsom’s comments during the sentencing phase of the trial took many observers in the courtroom by surprise.

Franklin County Prosecuting Attorney Bob Parks called Folsom to the stand and asked him how the shooting had impacted his life.

In some of the more dramatic testimony of the trial, Folsom told the jury that it changed his life forever and had devastated his family and his career. He said that he now suffers from post-traumatic stress disorder as a result of the shooting.

“After I arrested, or tried to arrest Mr. Weinhaus, Jeff’s friends on Cop Block posted stories about how I lied and put pictures of me shooting Mr. Weinhaus. My family and friends see that when they Google my name,” Folsom testified.

He then suggested that the Missouri Highway Patrol didn’t stand by him after the shooting.

“My employer didn’t do its job ... they turned their backs on me,” Folsom added.

Folsom said he only received one day off after the shooting even though he requested more time off. He indicated that he has been on medical leave for a period of time.

“When I complained my boss rubbed me off and out ... I didn’t want to go and arrest him (Weinhaus), but, because he called the wrong person a ‘mother (expletive,)’ I lost my job. I’m eight years from retirement, now in five or six months I won’t have a job,” he said.

Lt. John Hotz, a public information officer for the Highway Patrol, declined on Friday to comment on any of the specifics of Folsom’s testimony. He did say that Folsom is still employed by the patrol.

Folsom alleged that if he returned to work his boss would file insubordination charges against him.

“I lost the ability to feed my children because one man decided he was going to start a revolution,” Folsom added.

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