Honor in Seeking the Truth - The Missourian: Letters To The Editor

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Honor in Seeking the Truth

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Posted: Wednesday, October 10, 2012 5:00 pm

To The Editor:

I would like to thank Mr. Guy Midkiff for labeling me a “conspiracy theorist.” I consider it an honor to be accused of questioning and searching for the truth.  Many people attach conspiracy theorists as kooks looking to stir up doubt and confusion. In reality, people like George Washington, John Adams and Thomas Jefferson were conspiracy theorists. They questioned the ruling government and did something about it.

The attack on Pearl Harbor is a more recent example. Many people still believe that the attack was a surprise, but the truth is FDR knew about the attack prior to it happening and refused to warn Adm. Kimmel, who ended up taking the blame for not being prepared. Thanks to untold numbers of “conspiracy theorists,” the truth finally prevailed and in 1993 the U.S. Congress finally acknowledged that Adm. Kimmel was not at fault. It only took a little over 50 years to set the record straight.  Sadly, there are still millions of people who would prefer to put their heads in the sand rather than learn the truth.

Mr. Midkiff, if you truly are a commercial airline pilot surely you can look up “Pilots for 9/11 Truth” on the Internet. It is very simple to do but, if you need help, let me know.  You can also look up Architects and Engineers for 9/11 Truth and dozens more organizations that are questioning what our government has told us.  

You may have been in New York on that disastrous day but you probably didn’t have any better view of the event than the rest of the country since cameras had already been set in place to record the entire event. Isn’t it great that someone had the foresight to make sure the whole world could witness this event over and over again. What great timing. Did you also see Building 7 implode on the afternoon of 9/11? This was a 47-story building and no airplane hit it. What is your explanation for this collapse? If you are wondering how big a 47-story building is I suggest you try to find one in St. Louis.

Mr. Midkiff, perhaps you can also explain how steel, that melts at about 2,700 degrees melted when jet fuel, at best does not burn hotter than about 1,600 degrees and only then if we can provide massive amounts of oxygen. In all reality the temperature of the jet fuel probably never exceeded 900-1,000 degrees and most of this burned outside the building. You could put a torch to steel at 1,600 degrees for eternity and not melt the steel.

Your statement that the angle clips that held the floor joists between columns succumbed to the heat and shifting loads virtually confirms the proof that something other than the fires or airplanes caused the failure. These types of failures do not occur everywhere all at once.  They would have had to do so in order to bring the buildings straight down.   

I agree, the jets did exist and they did hit the two twin towers. The rest of your claims defy science. Steel doesn’t melt at 1,600 degrees,  buildings do not collapse uniformly unless they are set with explosives, gravity is a downward pull not a horizontal force, concrete doesn’t pulverize to dust just because you drop it, and the laws of thermodynamics cannot be refuted just on Sept. 11, 2001, and no other time in history.  

Mr. Midkiff, of all the people who visited our showing of the film regarding 9/11, I do not believe a single person left believing that those planes or fires brought those buildings down.  Since you didn’t show up at any of our showings you apparently preferred to close your eyes to the facts.  I intend to have additional showings and would invite you to attend.  But a word of caution, you may have to eat a few of your words including the word you taught our children — “why.” You will also learn the “why.”

Regarding Neil Armstrong, yes, I believe he did make it to the moon and back.  As a young engineer just out of school in the early 1960s, I had the opportunity to work on the Mercury program at McDonnell Douglas and know what a great program that was.

/opinion/letters_to_the_editor