Polilitical Correct Sickness - The Missourian: Opinion

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Polilitical Correct Sickness

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Posted: Friday, May 3, 2013 6:32 pm

We don’t know about you, our readers, but we are sick of political correctness nonsense. Our attention was directed to Washington, D.C., where the Redskins football team is under attack because the team’s nickname is offensive to Native Americans.

A few local leaders and pundits in D.C. have called for a name change. The opponents have launched a legal challenge intended to deny the team federal trademark protection. A bill has been introduced in Congress that would do the same thing. The bill is not expected to go anywhere. What nonsense!

A poll was conducted by the Associated Press-Gfk and it showed that nationally, the name Redskins has wide support. Nearly four in five Americans don’t think the team should change its name. Although we weren’t asked, we’re with that majority group. Only 11 percent support a name change, 8 percent weren’t sure and 2 percent didn’t answer. Slightly over 1,000 adults were polled.

It’s issues such as this, we have found, that young people are more likely to be in the politically correctness camp than adults. Of note is that the Kansas City Star has a policy of not using the word Redskins. A Washington City Paper substitutes the word “Pigskins” instead of Redskins. Maybe they should call the team “Whiteskins.” Probably that wouldn’t meet the ridiculous politically correctness standards since many of the players have black skin.

When is this nonsense going to stop? So much time is wasted on matters such as this. There are so many other important matters we should be spending our time on than trying to change the traditional nicknames for athletic teams. We know a few people with Indian blood in them and we’ve never heard them complain about the use of the word Redskins.

There was a Little League football team in WashMO called the Redskins back in the late 1950s and 1960s. Political correctness hadn’t been born at that time. We didn’t hear a single complaint about the name. It was somewhat of an honor to be called a Redskins player in those days.

/opinion