Be Yourself — Good Advice - The Missourian: Opinion

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Be Yourself — Good Advice

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Posted: Friday, February 24, 2012 2:00 pm | Updated: 12:08 pm, Mon Feb 11, 2013.

Newly installed Cardinal Timothy M. Dolan offered some good advice when he was interviewed after his installation ceremony. We thought of Mitt Romney when he said what he did.

A New York Times reporter was talking to Cardinal Dolan about the latter’s cheerful personality and his down-to-earth approach to life. Cardinal Dolan said, “You got to be yourself, right?” He added, “Why put on airs? Why try to be somebody different ?”

Romney in his presidential campaign at times tries to be different and it’s an attempt to downplay airs, so to speak.  For instance, wearing jeans when campaigning. He wants to change his image and seemingly believes if he wears jeans he will look like the common guy and garner votes that way. That’s not the real Romney. One would think his campaign handlers would be street smart enough to know that’s not going to change his image.

For some reason Romney has not caught on with a lot of voters, even though he may get the Republican nomination. If he does it won’t be because he’s wearing jeans. He did wear a suit and tie during Wednesday night’s debate in Arizona.

Trying to be somebody you are not, in most cases does not work.

Be yourself regardless of the heights you may reach is good advice. Harry Truman never changed when he became president. He was still the small-county official from Missouri who never belied his farming background. He never tried to be something he wasn’t. With these modest words he recognized that it was the office that counts more than the person in the White House: “When you get to be president, there are all those things, the honors, the 21-gun salutes, all those things. You have to remember it isn’t for you. It’s for the presidency.”

By the way, when Truman ran for public office, even the presidency in 1948, he didn’t wear bib overalls! He was a tie and suit guy.

/opinion

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