The Polls Reflect Moods - The Missourian: Opinion

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The Polls Reflect Moods

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Posted: Friday, December 20, 2013 6:00 pm

The steady stream of polls on various topics have proven to be pretty accurate on the moods of people surveyed. We’ve all heard of governing by the polls and it has happened. We have had presidents who governed by checking the polls for the direction to Favoriteville.

The moods of voters, for instance, change much like the weather with less speed on many issues. Voters’ moods are influenced by happenings. Polls on how people plan to vote have proven to be accurate when all votes are in and counted.

One of the latest polls to hit the streets was conducted by Associated Press-GfK. Overall it found that people are feeling better about the economy and worst about our elected officials in Washington, D.C. President Obama did not fare well: 58 percent of the people polled disapprove of the job he is doing, while 42 percent approve.

Members of Congress are held in low esteem — that’s the mood of people now. Nearly 9 in 10 adults disapprove of the way lawmakers are handling their jobs. That mood was no surprise. That’s the direction the polling has revealed for some time.

Of note is that the poll found that 55 percent of Americans would like a process in which legal status would be possible for millions of immigrants. The Senate has approved a plan to do that, but the issue hasn’t gone anywhere in the House.

Congressional approval stands at 13 percent, with 86 percent of adults disapproving. The poll found that Democrats have a slim edge as the party Americans would prefer to control Congress — 39 percent to 33 percent, with 27 percent saying it doesn’t matter.

Incumbents in the House aren’t in good standing right now. Sixty-two percent of registered voters said they’d like someone new to represent their congressional district next year, while 37 percent support their incumbents’ re-election.

Since the elections are months away, the mood of voters could change several times before voters cast ballots.

We were among Americans who once didn’t put much faith in polls. That has changed because the polls have proven to be right so many times. The polling is a bit more sophisticated now. Tracking the moods of voters is an art of sorts and lucrative for the pollsters.

When the telephone rings, however, and you are asked to partake in the polls, the mood you are in may motivate you to hang up, especially if you have just begun your dinner! Sometimes you may be more irritated with the poll caller than with our elected officials.

/opinion

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