City to Explore Cost Share Grant Program for Stormwater Problems - The Missourian: News

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City to Explore Cost Share Grant Program for Stormwater Problems

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Posted: Wednesday, June 26, 2013 9:18 am | Updated: 9:13 am, Tue Jul 2, 2013.

The Washington City Council agreed to explore the possibility of setting aside a certain percentage of stormwater funds to help take care of residents’ stormwater issues.

The issue arose at the council’s administrations/operations committee meeting Monday night.

Two residents, Doug and Shawna Maune, addressed the council on a stormwater issue at their home on Lake View Drive in Lake Washington Estates subdivision.

The couple said an easement runs through their yard and drains water into the yard and pool. During storms, their yard is eroded. They have been battling the issue since they built their home 11 years ago.

Doug Maune said it doesn’t matter how much rain there is, it always floods his road and erodes his yard. He is forced to fill ruts and maintain it because it affects his yard.

Jim Briggs, city administrator, said the city was first made aware that there was a pipe discharging water in the vicinity of the road that goes to a house outside of the city limits when the home was being built.

At that time, a system of terraces was created to take water around the house. All parties signed off saying the terraces were an acceptable solution, however, Maune said that he only signed off because the city told him it was the right thing to do.

Later, a pool was put in. Briggs said the terraces were removed at that time and a retaining wall was installed near the rear of the property line and water was coming off the top and discharging into the pool.

Maune said the terraces were not removed and that the swale was inadequate.

Dan Boyce, city engineer, said the subdivision improvement plans the city was provided did not indicate that there was a culvert on the road feeding the back of the lot.

“The engineered plans did not show us that,” he said. “We had no way of knowing.”

Doug Maune said it’s the city’s job to protect the citizens by making sure developers are not doing something that could harm their home or lot and that he feels that the city led him down the wrong path.

There has been discussion about including funds for various projects in next year’s budget, Mayor Sandy Lucy said.

Lucy said there are several stormwater issues in town that could benefit from the funds.

The stormwater fund has $2.9 million and another $400,000 still coming this year.

She suggested that there be an application process and possibly a cost-share program, though the percentage the city would pay is still to be decided.

“We’ve got to work out the details, but if we could do that in the budget, maybe we could take care of some of these ongoing problems,” Lucy said, adding that 10 percent of the stormwater funds earned could be set aside for the program each year.

There are a lot of residents who call the city for stormwater problems, but there are others who just “put up with it,” Lucy said.

Jeff Patke said the city should do its due diligence to address citizens’ problems.

Walt Meyer, council member, supported the grant program.

“One by one we can start eliminating some of (the issues),” he said.

Briggs said there are 10 to 12 areas in town that have stormwater problems, partly because Washington developed stormwater design standards only 10 to 15 years ago.

The stormwater fund was voted on by the people in about 1995, Briggs said. Funds are set aside to build a stormwater facility, primarily outside the city; however, the city has not found a suitable property for the facility at a reasonable price to effectively reduce the flood heights at Busch Creek, Briggs said.

The Washington City Council agreed to explore the possibility of setting aside a certain percentage of stormwater funds to help take care of residents’ stormwater issues.

The issue arose at the council’s administrations/operations committee meeting Monday night.

Two residents, Doug and Shawna Maune, addressed the council on a stormwater issue at their home on Lake View Drive in Lake Washington Estates subdivision.

The couple said an easement runs through their yard and drains water into the yard and pool. During storms, their yard is eroded. They have been battling the issue since they built their home 11 years ago.

Doug Maune said it doesn’t matter how much rain there is, it always floods his road and erodes his yard. He is forced to fill ruts and maintain it because it affects his yard.

Jim Briggs, city administrator, said the city was first made aware that there was a pipe discharging water in the vicinity of the road that goes to a house outside of the city limits when the home was being built.

At that time, a system of terraces was created to take water around the house. All parties signed off saying the terraces were an acceptable solution, however, Maune said that he only signed off because the city told him it was the right thing to do.

Later, a pool was put in. Briggs said the terraces were removed at that time and a retaining wall was installed near the rear of the property line and water was coming off the top and discharging into the pool.

Maune said the terraces were not removed and that the swale was inadequate.

Dan Boyce, city engineer, said the subdivision improvement plans the city was provided did not indicate that there was a culvert on the road feeding the back of the lot.

“The engineered plans did not show us that,” he said. “We had no way of knowing.”

Doug Maune said it’s the city’s job to protect the citizens by making sure developers are not doing something that could harm their home or lot and that he feels that the city led him down the wrong path.

There has been discussion about including funds for various projects in next year’s budget, Mayor Sandy Lucy said.

Lucy said there are several stormwater issues in town that could benefit from the funds.

The stormwater fund has $2.9 million and another $400,000 still coming this year.

She suggested that there be an application process and possibly a cost-share program, though the percentage the city would pay is still to be decided.

“We’ve got to work out the details, but if we could do that in the budget, maybe we could take care of some of these ongoing problems,” Lucy said, adding that 10 percent of the stormwater funds earned could be set aside for the program each year.

There are a lot of residents who call the city for stormwater problems, but there are others who just “put up with it,” Lucy said.

Jeff Patke said the city should do its due diligence to address citizens’ problems.

Walt Meyer, council member, supported the grant program.

“One by one we can start eliminating some of (the issues),” he said.

Briggs said there are 10 to 12 areas in town that have stormwater problems, partly because Washington developed stormwater design standards only 10 to 15 years ago.

The stormwater fund was voted on by the people in about 1995, Briggs said. Funds are set aside to build a stormwater facility, primarily outside the city; however, the city has not found a suitable property for the facility at a reasonable price to effectively reduce the flood heights at Busch Creek, Briggs said.

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