Some Laughs, Tears Shed For ‘My Family for the War’ - The Missourian: My MO

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Some Laughs, Tears Shed For ‘My Family for the War’

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Posted: Friday, April 27, 2012 2:32 pm | Updated: 2:38 pm, Fri Apr 27, 2012.

When I chose to read “My Family for the War” by Anne C. Voorhoeve, I was expecting a story about a family who experienced war, but I did not expect it to be one of the greatest books I have ever read.

The author tells the story from the perspective of a young girl who grows older and wiser as readers turn the pages.

I recommend it to all the teens who like suspenseful stories.

This book is about two Jewish, German teenage girls who lived during World War II and all of the dangers they faced being in Germany when all Jews were frowned and spat upon.

The author has divided this book into three parts: Survival Plan 1938–1939, Blackout 1939-1940, and Returning Home 1941–1945.

In Survival Plan, the first part, the war is beginning and readers learn that the main character, 10-year-old Franziska Mangold, or Frances, as she becomes known later, is confronting bullies at every turn.

My favorite part was that she and her friends drew a map of all the escape routes in the neighborhood.

As the story goes on, Frances gets sent away from her family on the kindertransport, a train which took the Jewish children from Germany to foster families in Britain to escape the war and persecution.

In the second part, Blackout, Frances is in Britain with her foster family. During her stay with the Orthodox family who took her in, Frances becomes very close to them.

However, she is confronted with confusion and sadness over being separated from her parents, and she must try to understand religion and what it really means to be Jewish and Christian.

In the third part, Returning Home, Frances finds her relatives left alive after the war.

In the end her friends are spread to different places and countries in the aftermath of the war while Frances tries to cope with the fact that her parents sent her away, even though she knows what horrors those that stayed behind faced.

It was interesting to read the afterword portion, which tells of the actual historical events that took place that the story is based on.

I totally recommend this book to all teens, preteens, and adults of all ages. There were a lot of laughs and a few tears shed while reading this book.

I believe that this story is something that will appeal to a lot of different readers. I think that all teens will love it, I know I did.

/mymo