St. Clair School principals shared English language assessments for the second quarter during a March meeting.

The new English Language Arts Curriculum for kindergarten through eighth grade was implemented this school year. St. Clair Elementary School Principal Sande Racherbaumer noted that the first and second quarter assessments test students on different standards whether they learned it in class or not.

“When you’re looking for that growth piece (from first to second quarter), you may not see it because it’s not an apple to apple comparison,” she said.

She added that a 60 percent is considered proficient. In kindergarten, students scored an average of 71 percent on the first quarter assessment and a 82 percent on the second quarter assessment.

“They actually did pretty well,” she said.

Students scoring below basic and basic categories decreased by 48.7 percent in the second quarter, and students scoring advanced and proficient increased by 48.7 percent, according to Racherbaumer.

She said this was a reflection of how well the teachers are doing.

She added that first-graders did well on both quarter assessments. First-graders scored an average of 65 percent in quarter one and in quarter two.

In second grade, students scored an average of 57 percent in the first quarter and a 59 percent in the second quarter. Students scoring in the basic category decreased by 5 percent and students scoring in the advanced and proficient categories increased by 3.9 percent in the second quarter.

“Overall, I was very proud of our kiddos,” Racherbaumer said. “I thought they did really well and hope we can continue to improve and keep making gains.”

Edgar Murray

In third grade, students scored an average of 37 percent on the first quarter assessment and a 33 percent on the second quarter assessment, according to Edgar Murray Principal Dr. Beth Hill.

“Our third-graders struggled with the second quarter benchmark test, which contained a higher complexity of questions. They struggled with research, listening and writing portions, so that’s something we’re going to continue to focus on for the rest of this year and next year as well,” she said.

She added that students scoring in the advanced and proficient categories decreased by 1 percent in the second quarter and students scoring in the basic categories increased by 2 percent.

Fourth-graders scored an average of 33 percent in the first quarter and an average of 45 percent in the second quarter. Students scoring in advanced and proficient categories increased by 25 percent in the second quarter, Hill said, and those scoring in the basic categories also decreased by 25 percent.

In fifth grade, the average assessment score stayed the same from first to second quarter, which was 36 percent.

“Our students scoring advanced and proficient increased by 3 percent and then our basic categories decreased by 3 percent,” Hill said.

Junior High

Sixth-graders scored an average of 41 percent on the first quarter assessment and students scored an average of 36 percent on the second quarter assessment, according to Junior High Principal Eric Lause.

He said there will be more of a gap between assessments in junior high grade levels.

“You’re going to see not as much growth or lack of growth,” Lause said.

In seventh grade, students scored an average of 39 percent in the first quarter and a 40 percent in the second quarter. Students scoring in advanced and proficient categories increased by 3 percent in the second quarter, according to Lause.

“We did have a little bit of growth, but it is very minimal,” he said.

Eighth-graders scored an average of 48 percent on the first quarter assessment and a 39 percent on the second quarter assessment.

“The numbers are clearly headed in the wrong way and that’s not where we want to be,” Lause said. “The rigor of the program is very difficult.”

He added that there are answers to questions that are similar and teachers are asking students to think “Which is the best answer?”