Help Needed to Learn More About Local Earthquake - The Missourian: Local News

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Help Needed to Learn More About Local Earthquake

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Posted: Wednesday, April 24, 2013 4:15 pm

The U.S. Geological Survey recorded a small earthquake Wednesday, April 10, in the area southwest of New Haven.

The earthquake occurred at exactly 9:54 a.m. (Central Daylight Time), just as strong thunderstorms were moving through the area.

The epicenter was in the general vicinity of the intersection of Highways VV and E. However, it is possible that the earthquake shaking could be felt miles from that area.

The earthquake magnitude is about 2.3. An earthquake of this magnitude may be felt by some people, especially if they are sitting quietly or lying down at the time.

Small vibrations, similar to a passing truck, may be noticed. Some wood-frame structures, such as homes or farm buildings, may creak or groan.

These earthquake effects may be more noticeable on the upper floors of a structure. Animals, including pets, livestock, and wild animals, may react as well.

Because of the thunderstorms that morning, people may not have realized that any small shake or vibration that they felt was due to an earthquake. They may have thought it was due to thunder or wind gusts.

Anyone who noticed any shaking or vibration or unusual sound at 9:54 a.m. April 10 is asked to share their observations with earthquake researchers. The researchers use the information to learn more about the earth’s crust.

Observations about this earthquake may be reported online at http://earthquake.usgs.gov/earthquakes/eventpage/nm041013a#dyfi.

Because there are so few earthquakes in this area, information about those that do occur is especially valuable.

According to the National Earthquake Information Center in Golden, Colo., the earthquake was recorded by instruments that were located near Cuba, Mo., and near Warrenton, Mo. Those instruments continually monitor the earth’s crust for small local earthquakes.

For more information, contact Phyllis Steckel at 636-239-4013 or psteckel@charter.net.

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