City May Take Over Meter Installation - The Missourian: Washington

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City May Take Over Meter Installation

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Posted: Sunday, February 10, 2013 8:00 am | Updated: 9:20 pm, Sat Jun 22, 2013.

Washington’s water meter project is 98 percent complete, according to Kevin Quaethem, water/wastewater superintendent.

The city contracted with Siemens Building Technologies and the firm’s installation partner, Pedal Valves, Inc. to install 6,746 new residential and commercial iPERL water meters in Washington.

A water meter installer from Pedal Valves Inc. (PVI) is still on site, and will remain on site until an agreement can be reached concerning the remaining 147 meters not yet installed, Quaethem said, adding that finalization of the project is in the works.

Of the meters that have not been installed, about 30 to 40 can still be installed, but haven’t either because of contact issues or meters that can’t be accessed. The others are in vacant homes and will be installed when the water is turned back on.

Quaethem said the project is in a very slow mode.

“What PVI is attempting to do is see if the city is willing to take over installation,” he said, adding that the financial aspect has not been worked out.

“There hasn’t been any true discussion of the monetary part of the meter installation,” he said.

Quaethem said he is still trying to come up with a number everyone can agree on.

“There’s a chance we never will,” he said. “At this point in time there’s no definite time line if the city would take it over or if Pedal Valves will stay on the job. It doesn’t look like (a financial agreement is) being reached. I won’t do anything unless it’s fair to the residents of Washington.”

Quaethem explained that there is a cost associated with each meter being installed.

“It’s only fair to city that the value of that meter that hasn’t been installed is handed back to the city for the project,” he said.

Overall, Quaethem said the project has been good.

“Once it’s all said and done, it really will benefit the residents,” he said.

The entire project will cost about $4,590,000 and is being funded through a lease agreement with lease payments being provided by a group of local banks. Under terms of the agreement, the city will pay interest costs totaling $1,154,838.50 over the 15-year term of the lease.

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