Another trio of reviews to share this month — congrats to the students who took the time to read my Book Buzz Picks and put pen to paper to write about what they thought of them. Their efforts will be rewarded with a prize book presented to each of them by the Washington Optimist Club. Until next month, Page On!

“Ragweed’s Farm Dog Handbook”

By Anne Vittur Kennedy

Reviewed by Mrs. Kluesner’s first-grade class, Central Elementary School.

“We loved this book! The pictures were absolutely beautiful. The dog is the main character. The setting is the farm. The plot is about a dog that is really silly; he tries to tell how to be a good dog by “taking care” of the farm animals, but he is really just trying to get dog biscuits. He didn’t really take care of the farm at all.

“We laughed almost every time we turned the page! One part grossed us out — if you would like to find out what that part is you need to read this book!

Reviewed by Aloisio Rodrigues, Immaculate Conception School. 

"This is a funny children's book, set on a farm.The book makes dogs seem very funny. The main characters are Ragweed the dog and the farmer. Ragweed tries to be a good dog but he is very silly.

"I liked the way the story was written; it was very funny. The author showed the funniness of dogs. My favorite part was when Ragweed threw up the biscuit then ate it again.

"I am kind of like the sheep because they are fast. I am also like the farmer because we are both human. I haven't read any other books like this.I recommend this book for ages 0-5 or to anyone who owns a dog.

"I give this book 6 out of 5 beehives."

“John Deere, That’s Who!”

By Tracy Maurer

Reviewed by Michael Haberberger, third grade, Crosspoint Christian School.

“John wanted to change the history of plowing. When the farmers would plow, this gross black stuff would get stuck to the plow and they would consistently have to scrape it off. So John made a plow so that the black would not get stuck. Wow!

“I think that this book is very good because John Deere was determined to make a plow, and I like determination.

“I would recommend this book to little boys because my little brother loves going with my dad outside to help him. He also rides on his little Gator. He would love this book.”

Reviewed by Ava Cobb, Crosspoint Christian School.

"John wanted to change the history of plowing. When the farmers would plow, this gross black stuff would get stuck to the plow, and they would consistently have to scrape it off. So John made a plow so that the black stuff would not get stuck. Wow!

"I think this book is very good because he was determined to make the plow and I like determination.

"I would recommend this book to little boys because my little brother loves going with my dad outside to help him. He also rides on his little Gator. He would love this book."

Reviewed by Allie Guenzler, Crosspoint Christian School.

"John Deere was a man who invented a better plow with a sharper blade. His plow helped a lot of farmers because the blade was sharp. It cut the gumbo. John Deere was a determined man.

"I did not really like this book because I like books with adventure and excitement, and I don't really like tractors. So I thought it was boring. But if you like tractors, or you live on a farm, you will like this book."

“Moo”

By Sharon Creech

Reviewed by Emma Thomas, seventh grade, Union Middle School.

“In ‘Moo,’ readers meet a widow named Mrs. Falala. She has a long silver braid, is from Italy, is interested in learning to draw, and loves animals. In fact, she lives with a pig, cat, cow, snake and parrot. She is about to get new neighbors.

“Wanting a change from big city living, Reena, her brother Luke, and their parents move to Maine. While on a bike ride, the kids see cows for the first time ever. As they pass Mrs. Falala’s home, they hear her playing the flute.

“After a chance meeting at the eye doctor, between Mrs. Falala and the kids’ mother, Reena, Luke, and their dad are drawn in when they bring drawing books to Mrs. Falala. Soon, Reena and Luke’s parents volunteer them to help Mrs. Falala. They end up taking care of her cow, Zora. Luke also helps Mrs. Falala learn to draw.

“When Mrs. Falala wants Reena to show Zora at the fair, Reena realizes it is harder to connect with Zora than she expected. Zep and Beat, two locals with farm experience, train Reena to work with Zora and become her friends.

“In the end, Mrs. Falala becomes a good artist. Zora wins a prize. Luke and Reena learn a few things too. If you want to learn more about the details, give ‘Moo’ a try. I give this book three out of five beehives.”

Reviewed by Madeleine Rodrigues, Immaculate Conception School. 

"This book is set on a farm in Maine. The purpose of this book is to show we are all connected.

"The main characters are Mrs. Falala, Luke, Reena, Zep and Zora. Luke and Reena move to Maine and learn to take care of farm animals.

"I liked how the author wrote this story- very different. She used bold letters, italics, made words bigger and smaller, and wrote words in different directions.

"The author got her point of friendship across. My favorite part was when Reena and Luke took Zara to the fair and she won 4th place.

"I am like Reena because we are about the same age and we both moved from the city out to the country. I have read another book by Sharon Creech, 'Ruby Holler,' which I also enjoyed. I am about to read another book by the same author, 'The Great Unexpected.'

"This book would be good for 3rd graders and up. Anyone who likes farms or the state of Maine would also enjoy reading this book. I give it 5 out of 5 beehives.

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