"Fetchingly Fine Reviews," September Book Buzz Picks - The Missourian: Newspapers In Education

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"Fetchingly Fine Reviews," September Book Buzz Picks

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Posted: Thursday, November 7, 2013 11:19 pm | Updated: 10:43 am, Fri Nov 8, 2013.

"Balto," by Meghan McCarthy.

Reviewed by Skylar Traffas, Third Grade, Central Elementary School.

"In this book, a kid from Alaska got a real bad disease, and the doctor had to order medicine from all the way from the other side of Alaska. The man who was delivering the medicine chose Balto as his leader. You should read this book because it's really inspiring.

“Patriotic Pals, Tails of Civil War Dogs,” by Chris Stuckenschneider

Reviewed by Zane Carter, Clark-Vitt Elementary School.

“This book is about two dogs that went around the U.S. learning about dogs that served in the Civil War.

“My favorite part was when they visited Hershey, Pennsylvania because it’s my favorite kind of chocolate. I think others should read this book because is a cool history book.”

Reviewed by Drake Haskell, Fifth Grade, Beaufort Elementary School.

“These two dogs, Chuck and Tilly, traveled to some Civil War battlefields to learn about some interesting dogs in the Civil War.

“My favorite part was when they talked about Abraham Lincoln because I really like him. I think other people should read this book because it is entertaining and you can learn some things.”

Reviewed by Kaeden Van, Fourth Grade, Clark Vitt Elementary School.

“This book is a really good one, and it’s about history but it’s fun. Tilly, the poodle, and Chuck, a border collie, go on an adventure together and have fun. It’s a good book. Read it.

“My favorite part is about the dog that catches bullets in his mouth. I like it because my dog died, but she is still with me, and that’s probably how the owner of that dog feels. He’s probably sad, but he knows his dog is with him, and that’s important.”

Reviewed by Evan Hall, Fifth Grade, Clark-Vitt Elementary School.

“In the first part of the book, Chuck and Tilly go to Tennessee to go to Civil War battlefields to see about important dogs in the war. Next, they travel to Virginia to see what important dogs were at those battlefields. Then they went through Maryland, Pennsylvania, Ohio and when they go to Illinois they skipped Indiana.

“They talked a lot about Abraham Lincoln’s dog. It was a great book.

“My favorite part is when they’re in Tennessee because Tilly bought a sweet tea and a moon pie. Other people should read this book because it tells a lot about Civil War dogs.”

Reviewed by Madison Raymond, Immaculate Conception School.

“My favorite character was Tilly. I think my cousin and Tommy would like this book. It’s about a trip that Chuck and Tilly took. Brutus chased bullets.

“I liked the part where Tilly kept saying, ‘Antietam, Antietam, Antietam.’

Fido was Abraham Lincoln’s dog. This book is also about dog history.”

Reviewed by Julia Huning, Fourth Grade, Clark-Vitt Elementary School.

“Here is a little bit about this book. Chuck, a border collie, and Tilly, a poodle will show you a bit of dog history. They tell stories about courageous dogs that were loved and helpful in other states. This book is grr-ific!

“My favorite part is when they tell the story of Stonewall because I think it was funny and a good idea to put the dog in an ambush when you are at battle. This was a very good story.”

“Buddy,” by M.H. Herlong.

Reviewed by Morgan Glass, Sixth Grade, Meramec Valley Middle School.

“Buddy takes place in New Orleans. The book shows you how far a boy will go for his dog. It shows how much people can love their pets.

“A boy’s family was on their way to church when they hit a dog. When they hit the dog, its leg was severely injured and then the dog only gets to keep three legs. The boy adopted the dog and named him Buddy. A flood happens, and they had to leave Buddy home—they lost him but he didn’t die.

“The author did get the point across. The parts I liked best were when the boy adopted Buddy, and I liked that he would to anything for Buddy, like stay with him in the flood.

“I related to the characters by showing how much I love dogs. I related to them by showing how I can give hard work. This book is similar to other books I have read by talking about work and dogs. It’s also similar by talking about love, hope and strength.

“The type of person who would enjoy this book is someone who likes to read about dogs. The book targets ages ten and up. I give this book four out of five beehives.”

Reviewed by Star Gaugh, Washington Middle School.

“I read ‘Buddy’ because I mostly read books about dogs. The main character is a boy named Lil’T. The book starts out plain then out of nowhere comes the grabber of the story—when Lil’T and his family were driving to church they hit a black dog. After they hit the dog, they took it to the church and from there it was taken to the vet.

“The vet said the dog needed a good home, so Lil’T earned some money and talked to his father. When they brought the dog home, Lil’T named him Buddy.

“The climax of the story was when Hurricane Katrina was heading to New Orleans. The hurricane caused almost everyone in the city to flee. Lil’T and his family had no room to put Buddy in the car, so they locked him inside the upstairs bathroom while they were away because they thought that the hurricane was going to miss the city. When Lil’T returned, Buddy was gone.

“I relate to Lil’T because I would do everything I can to find the dog I loved the most. I believe this story was very well written because they tried to connect to the main character. I would recommend this book to middle school students, and to dog lovers in the world. I would rate this book four beehives because the heart of the read is drawn to the book and it is put together well.

Reviewed by Ethan King.

“The book ‘Buddy’ was a great read. I enjoyed the characters and their slang. The two main characters, Lil’T and Buddy (the dog) were very well described. I liked the plot with its ups and downs, and the setting was also well described. I really loved this book.

“I could relate to it because I’m the same age as Lil’T, and also have an annoying little sister. I have also had three dogs, before the two I have now, Lady and Duchess. The last dog I had, I had gotten very attached to, but when I was seven years old, it tried to be protective of me and bit me in the mouth while I was petting another dog (which I think is a little ironic). Lil’T’s dad is another character I can relate to because he seems very similar to my dad—stubborn as a mule and strong as an ox.

“The settings of the book all sounded either amazing, with beautiful water and bustling streets, or horrific, with everything damaged or ruined. There was a place in the book I enjoyed the most, and that was the new owner’s house, located right beside a glistening ocean.

“I really liked how the author’s dialogue was spoken in the type of slang that us modern kids use instead of perfect “proper English.” Since I am also just a kid, it was easier to read and understand than most books. This book is around sixth or seventh grade reading level, but could be enjoyed by both adults and children. It is compelling read and almost impossible to put down.

“The plot of the book was amazing. In the beginning, a boy, who loves dogs, hits one. They have to amputate the dog’s leg, all the while the boy begs and pleads with his family to let him keep it. When the boy finally persuades his parents, they have to leave Buddy while one of the most dangerous storms is about to hit them.

“When the coast is clear, they finally arrive at the house to find that the dog has survived but been taken away from his beloved owner. How far will a boy go for the one he loves?”

Reviewed by Isabella Rice, Fourth Grade, Immaculate Conception School.

“I like this book because it tells about a boy and a dog who has three legs. Somehow at the end of the book, the boy didn’t want the dog. He was in Californiat, staying with a family who has the dog.”

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