August Book Buzz Picks Feature Barnyard Friends - The Missourian: Newspapers In Education

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August Book Buzz Picks Feature Barnyard Friends

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Posted: Monday, August 4, 2014 11:45 am | Updated: 9:15 am, Wed Aug 6, 2014.

Newsbee turns hay seed this month, introducing young readers to Book Buzz Picks that feature “Barnyard Friends” for August. There’s plenty to moo-moo, cluck and bray about in this trio of books that’ll have you squealing with bee-light. Hoof it over to your library and check one out today.

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“Lazy Daisy, Cranky Frankie,” by Mary Ellen Jordan.

It’s madcap mayhem at the farm in “Lazy Daisy, Cranky Frankie,” a charming barnyard yarn by Mary Ellen Jordan. Catchy rhyme will charm the spots off a Holstein, and have kiddos begging to have this book read time and again.

There’s nothing predictable about the animals on the farm. “None of the animals do what they should.” The pig doesn’t wallow in the mud — “instead she stares at her reflection, “My oh my, you are perfection.”

The piggy has nothing on Lizzie the chicken. She’s supposed to be egg sitting but instead cavorts around on her toes, dancing “in her purple underwear.” The animals’ strange behavior gets the narrator’s goat.

Readers of all ages will fall for this fun book with equally endearing illustrations by Andrew Weldon.

* * * * * * * * * * *

“Moo Who?” by Margie Palantini.

Hilda Mae Heifer is a songbird with a voice as melodic as an opera singer. All that changes when she’s bopped on the head in “Moo Who?” by the prolific, and very funny Margie Palantini.

Hilda’s on key grazing in the field until “Whiz. Wham. Klunk.” A cow pie hits her with the velocity of a line drive knocking the music right out of her mind, leaving Hilda Mae “a bit dazed, a tad dizzy.” Instead of her melodic moos, she honks like a goose, peeps like a chicken and issues oinks to rival any sour-smelling sow.

Repeatedly her animal friends try to reason with Hilda Mae, asking her if she lays eggs, or if she has a curly tail, but the divine bovine remains in “la-la,” not “do-re-mi,” land. She’s as off-key as she can be.

It’s kitty to the rescue. With a bevy of questions, tiger cat helps Hilda Mae realize her true identity and “get her moo back.” With exaggerated, colorful illustrations, artist Keith Graves gives Hilda Mae and her friends plenty of personality and facial expressions plus.

* * * * * * * * * * *

“Macadoo of Maury River,” by Gigi Amateau.

A Belgian shares his story in “Macadoo of Maury River,” the fictional tale of a draft horse by Gigi Amateau, the second book in the Maury River series.

Though Belgians, the gentle draft giants, were historically desired for their strength, Macadoo’s father warns him their breed isn’t of much use any longer. “The world has almost forgotten us,” he says.

At times, that seems to be the case, as Macadoo faces trials and mistreatment at auctions, sold more than once to the highest bidder. When Macadoo finds a loving home with Izzy and his grandfather, fate intervenes and the Belgian again wonders what will become of him.

Through it all, Macadoo retains courage and hope. His lifelong desire to serve mankind remains his primary goal, one fulfilled in a special way at Maury River Stables in Virginia with children who make and leave a lasting mark on his heart.

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