Romance Front and Center in "Just One Day" - The Missourian: Blogs

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Romance Front and Center in "Just One Day"

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Posted: Tuesday, November 5, 2013 11:21 am | Updated: 11:28 am, Tue Nov 5, 2013.

"Just One Day," by Gayle Forman is a modern romance with a historical twist. Shakespeare is that historical aspect; the two main characters meet because of his amazing works.

Allyson, the narrator and main character of the story, is touring Europe over the summer with her best friend for their senior trip. On one of the last days of her trip, she meets Willem. Willem, a Dutchman, is also touring Europe but he is part of a theatrical troupe. They meet when Allyson and her best friend decide to see his troupe perform Shakespeare's play Twelfth Night. Circumstances lead to them spending a single day together that ends up impacting the rest of their lives.

In "Just One Day," we see Allyson's journey. We watch as she transforms from a quiet good girl into an assertive woman who knows what she wants in her life. She no longer follows blindly what her parents tell her she must do, or what they and society consider to be the correct path. After a year of self-discovery her story comes to a close, leaving a nail biting wait for the next installment. The story continues in "Just One Year.”

I truly enjoyed "Just One Day." The modern romance jumps from good to great with the hint of Shakespeare because it adds a new element to a story that would be just like the hundreds of other romances of today's society. Allyson and Willem are wonderful characters that work well together, and you can get lost in their story which is the best part of a book. Also, Allyson is an extremely relatable character which only makes the novel better. I would most definitely recommend this book.

Another intriguing story that follows the same basic plot line with different twists is "13 Little Blue Envelopes," by Maureen Johnson and its sequel "The Last Little Blue Envelope."

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