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“The Very Impatient Caterpillar” is a zany book featuring a caterpillar with a character flaw. Ross Burach’s insect is short on patience but long on boisterous behavior.

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Sandra Day O’Connor was born in El Paso, Texas and grew up on a remote cattle ranch in Arizona. In the era when women were expected to be homemakers, O’Connor set her sights on Stanford University. She graduated in 1952 near the top of her class, but in spite of her excellent education, no l…

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This suspenseful mystery focuses on Charlie Cates, a journalist who has visions of missing children. The story begins with Charlie following her vision/dream about Alex Rocio, a missing 12-year-old boy.

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Author Ursula K. Le Guin is one of my favorite authors and the latest subject in the “Last Interview” series of books. David Streitfeld edits and writes the introduction to several interviews conducted over Le Guin’s life, including the last interview before she passed away on January 22, 20…

Prepare for a wild ride with Peter Heller’s “The River,” a slim volume that sets your nerves on edge as the pages turn — and they fly in the gifted storyteller’s hands. Heller juxtaposes the beauty and harmony of nature with the horror of a “megafire,” and pure evil doled out by crazed men.

“The Only Woman in the Room,” by Marie Benedict, is a fascinating story of Hedy Lamarr, most famous for being a 1940s movie star. Because of recent publications and documentaries, many people know now that Lamarr also was an inventor of the scientific process of “frequency hopping” which was…

“The Red Address Book,” is a must read for anyone who has ever played cards or learned how to crochet under the watchful eyes of their Gran.

Today we welcome our first review from Lyllian Neuberger, a junior at Washington High School, and an avid reader. Some of Lyllian’s favorite books are “All the Bright Places,” by Jennifer Niven, “Looking for Alaska,” by John Green or any of the novels from the “Heroes of Olympus” series by R…

The 1959 publication of Strunk and White’s “Elements of Style,” a book “Time Magazine” called “one of the 100 best and most influential books written in English since 1923,” marked a watershed moment in American letters. For the first time a concise manual of English composition was availabl…

If you love movies and movie history, “The Wild Bunch, Sam Peckinpah, a Revolution in Hollywood, and the Making of a Legendary Film,” is your book. It is a well-researched, detailed account of the movie, “The Wild Bunch.” The book also offers a glimpse into 1968, the year the film released, …

Given the snowy winter we have had, I could not help picking up “The Illustrated History of the Snowman.” Bob Eckstein has written the definitive book on Frosty and friends, tracing their history back to the Dark Ages.

Reviewed by Debbie Bandy, who recently moved to the area after teaching English in Charleston, South Carolina for 25 years. She enjoys reading science fiction, fantasy, historical fiction and non-fiction, and books about travel.

At the turn of the 19th century, the Judicial Branch was the weakest of the three branches of the young United States republic. But then, in 1801, President John Adams appointed a Revolutionary War veteran and congenial gentleman, John Marshall, to be the fourth Chief Justice of the United States.

Today we welcome a new reviewer, Megan Duncan, a junior at Washington High School who has a passion for reading, writing and journalism. Megan is “open to all books but her favorites are romance and fantasy related.” By reviewing for MO Books, she “hopes to help inspire others to read new bo…

The follow-up to “Girl, Wash Your Face,” by bestselling author Rachel Hollis was just released and it’s a game changer for women. You won’t want to miss “Girl Stop Apologizing, A Shame-Free Plan for Embracing and Achieving Your Goals,” a guidebook that give us permission to dream again. The …

“The New Iberia Blues” is James Lee Burke’s 22nd book in the Dave Robicheaux series. It’s a crime fiction novel full of twists and injustices. The novel includes ritual murders, corruption in the Hollywood film industry, the mafia, a hit man and a Texan prison escapee—its political and socia…

Those old enough to recall television of the early 1950s will remember Guy Madison’s portrayal of Wild Bill Hickok as a clean-shaven, well-shorn, clear-eyed lawman. This character was based−in name only−on the real James Butler Hickok, whose life is described in Tom Clavin’s latest book, “Wi…

“The Huntress,” by Kate Quinn, is a historical fiction novel about World War II set in the war years and the late 1940’s. The book, an easy read, deftly floats between the time period and is told through the eyes of three very different characters who deliver their stories in alternating chapters.

Authors David Lee Miller and Steven Jay Rubin chose a loyal feline as the narrator for “The Cat Who Lived with Anne Frank.” Mouschi relates the historic tale, giving it appeal to children who adore animal stories.

In the sparkling city of Paris in 1889, there are secrets deeper than the catacombs. In a world where everything is based on power, there will be one man who’ll go against the norm, Servin, a treasure hunter, will work to uncover his true self and his inheritance. Readers meet Servin in “The…

“Becoming” is a heartfelt and refreshing autobiography of one of the most highly recognizable persons of our time. In this surprisingly intimate look at the life of the former First Lady, Obama has structured the reflections of her 55 years into three parts: “Becoming Me,” a discussion of he…

Today we welcome Aimee Appell, a new reviewer to MO Books. Aimee is a pastor, mother, knitter, and avid reader, mostly of science fiction, fantasy, and theology. Last year, she made “a personal commitment to read books that involve perspectives that are outside of my normal experience, which…

If you are a concerned/ informed citizen and voter, “Zucked: The Education of an Unlikely Activist,” is a definite read, but don’t expect a biography of Mark Zuckerberg. This hard hitting book is an account of the culture of Facebook, Google and Twitter, and is alarming to say the least.

“How I Became a Spy,” by Deborah Hopkinson, is a World War II mystery with an exciting plot, factual details, believable/empathic characters, and examples of ciphers that will be fun to figure out with young readers.

“The Paragon Hotel,” by Lyndsay Faye, is one of those "can't put down-er” books. You'll want to keep reading until your body forces sleep upon you.

In his debut novel, “The Silent Patient,” author Alex Michaelides presents a psychological thriller sure to be welcomed by readers fond of this genre. Twists and turns, a startling finish, and main characters burdened with ominous emotional stress make this a book readers won’t easily forget.

Novelist and essayist Pam Houston describes her years living on and maintaining a 120-acre Colorado ranch site in her new book, “Deep Creek.” Part memoir, part elegy to her observations on the destruction of the earth, and part almanac documenting the changing of the seasons, “Deep Creek” is…

“Where were you when you first heard President Kennedy had been shot?” We can all answer that question, even if the answer is, “’I wasn’t born yet.’” This is the first line of David Bowman’s latest novel “Big Bang.” Bowman contends that the November 22, 1963 assassination was an earth-shatte…

“A Curse So Dark and Lonely,” by Brigid Kemmerer, is a beautifully captivating retelling of “Beauty and the Beast” with many similarities to the original story, but more gloom than the Disney version.

In Karin Slaughter’s newest book, “Pieces of Her,” life is quiet for Andrea in the small town of Belle Isle, Georgia. Its beautiful beaches attract tourists and snowbirds. Andrea lives with her mother, a speech pathologist.

Sylvain Neuvel’s novella, “The Test,” is very good near-future science fiction. It’s hard to talk about it without revealing the twist about 30 pages into it. That twist is essential to the book, but it’s a joy to discover the twist yourself.

Biographer Christopher Sandford’s “The Man Who Would Be Sherlock” is an interesting and insightful portrait of the creator of Sherlock Holmes. In this biography, Sandford focuses on Arthur Conan Doyle’s long career as an amateur investigator who lobbies for justice in controversial criminal …

Have you ever heard of Winnie-The-Pooh? The true story of the bear is the basis of “Winnie’s Great War” by Lindsay Mattick and Josh Geenhut.

This novel is based on the premise that in the mid 1800s the Cheyenne tribe proposed to white authorities that they trade 1,000 white women for 1,000 horses. No evidence exists to suggest this ever happened, but author Jim Fergus has written two engaging books based on this supposition, “100…

Surprises often come with a ring of the doorbell, but it’s unlikely you’ll find a butler on the front step like the family in “Pay Attention, Carter Jones,” by Gary D. Schmidt.

“The Girls at 17 Swann Street,” by Yara Zgheib, is an incredibly beautiful and gripping story about a young woman trying to live with anorexia.

“An Anonymous Girl,” by Greer Hendricks and Sarah Pekkanen, is a dark psychological thriller full of twists and suspense. It is a story of deceit, jealousy and obsession.

Foreign policy specialist Robert Kagan warns that the “liberal world order” established by the United States after World War II is in trouble. The author, who served in the Reagan State Department, believes “the liberal order is like a garden, artificial and forever threatened by the forces …

The Book holds the record of every event that ever has, is, or will come to pass. And it’s the only book in existence. In the swashbuckling world of Kelanna, there is no reading or written word, only the Guard—a secret, powerful society that harbors the magic of writing. But the Guard no lon…

Love, dignity, and purpose, especially as it relates to torture in the fight for freedom, form the themes of this memoir by Ndaba Mandela, grandson of Nelson Mandela.

Based on her family’s experiences and that of a friend coming to America, respectively in 1900 and 1911, Lesléa Newman stirs our hearts with “Gittel’s Journey, An Ellis Island Story.” Newman’s book is a tribute to the 3 million Jews who immigrated to America from 1880 to 1924, largely to esc…

“The Wicked King,” by Holly Black, is the captivating, action-packed sequel to the amazing “Cruel Prince.”

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“Real power is— I don’t even want to use the word— fear.” That tenet, spoken to a reporter by Donald Trump on March 31, 2016, is the origin of the title for Bob Woodward’s 19th book. Since becoming president, Donald Trump has attempted to make American citizens fearful of international trade…

This dystopian novel has strong political notes and an unfulfilling love story. There are also a lot of references to behavioral psychology and cold war politics.

The old expression, “Be careful what you wish for,” could be the theme of “I Wish it Would Snow,” by Sarah Dillard. The book’s main character is an exuberant bunny that longs for the white stuff, starting back in the fall, when he sits on the forest floor surrounded by piles of red and gold.…

Noah Hawley’s book “The Punch” is a black comedy telling the story of a family torn apart then brought together by the death of the patriarch and center of the family, Joe Henry. His death brings out the best and the worst in his two sons and wife.

“Little Dancer Aged Fourteen” is a historical look into Paris in the 1880s when Edgar Degas created the infamous bronze figure of a ballet dancer. Using historical research, author Camille Laurens, compiles the story surrounding the life of artist Edgar Degas and the model who posed for “The…

Eminent historian Joseph J. Ellis has written an important book focusing on how four founders of the United States thought about and dealt with four contentious issues that are still disturbing American society and government today.

Creativity blossomed for a young English artist who wanted to “paint America,” after his family was forced to move to the United States. “Picturing America: Thomas Cole and the Birth of American Art,” by Hudson Talbott, details Cole’s contributions to a style of artwork he gave birth to in t…

“The Towering Sky,” by Katharine McGee, is set in New York, 2119; it’s the final book in her three book series. The skyscraper featured in the book flows with the energy of the five teenagers whose lives have been threaded together by fate.

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