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In the 1920s, the wealthiest people in the world were the Osage Indians. Once oil was discovered beneath their North Eastern Oklahoma acreage the Osage became staggeringly well-off. They built splendid homes, sent their children abroad to the best schools, kept servants and owned the latest …

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“The Shortest Way Home,” by Miriam Parker, is a quick read with a theme of self-discovery. It's a story filled with love, family, friendship, new beginnings and wine.

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“Nothing was forgiven…Somethings were forgotten, but only for a time. But nothing is ever forgiven.” This statement is the thread that runs through “Up From Freedom,” by Wayne Grady.

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Francine Day is successful; she plays by the rules. She is well on her way to becoming one of the most prestigious lawyers in her firm in “Mine,” by J.L. Butler.

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The title “The King’s Witch” refers to a fictional young woman, Frances Borgees, the favorite caretaker of the daughter of King James VI of England, successor to Queen Elizabeth (1558-1603). Frances was a healer who used herbs and flowers to cure her patients. King James persecuted witches a…

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“Vox,” by Christina Dalcher, is set in the United States, in a world like our own, but where women can only speak 100 words a day. When you consider that average people speak around 16,000 words per day, 100 words is nothing but a crumb at a feast.

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Doris Kearns Goodwin was inspired to write her latest book after a student asked her, “How can I be like the giants you write about? Could I recognize whether I will be a leader?”

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Have some zany “007” fun with “Mac B., Kid Spy.” Anything author Mac Barnett writes wows me from the get-go, but he scores five “Goldfingers” with this clever tale of espionage, illustrated by Mike Lowery.

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Richard Powers’ twelfth novel, “The Overstory,” is the most recent of his explorations of the relationship between, in his words, “human ingenuity and natural fecundity.”

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In 1970, futurists Heidi and Alvin Toffler wrote “Future Shock” in which they defined the term as a certain psychological state of individuals and entire societies.Their short definition for future shock is “too much change in too short a period of time."

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“Buried Beneath the Baobab Tree,” by Adaobi Tricia Nwaubani, is a heart-wrenching reimagining of an innocent, bright young girl kidnapped by the Boko Haram terrorist group.

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The contemporary thriller, “The Last Cruise,” is a melodramatic story of a nightmarish cruise. The Queen Isabella, a 1950s vintage ocean liner is making her final voyage to Hawaii before being retired and scrapped. The cruise company, Cabaret, has decided to make Queen Isabella’s last cruise…

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“The Masterpiece,” by Fiona Davis, is a historical novel that involves two time periods—one during the late 1920s, when Grand Central Terminal in New York City was bustling, beautiful, and housed businesses, studios and apartments, and the second in the mid-1970s when the terminal was in dec…

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In the young adult novel “Tyler Johnson Was Here,” Marvin Johnson is concerned about his twin, Tyler. His brother is starting to hang around with a crowd that is known for selling drugs and starting trouble.

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I was a student intern at the St. Louis State Hospital on Arsenal Street about 50 years ago. Initially called The St. Louis County Lunatic Asylum when it opened in 1869, the original buildings were still the heart of the campus in the early 1970s. None of these buildings was air-conditioned,…

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Good books for tweens can be difficult to find – a personal favorite features a mouse with innocence, posh and charisma, Babymouse is now more grownup and the star of a series that kicked off in 2017, “Babymouse Tales from the Locker,” by Jennifer L. Holm and Matthew Holm.

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“Sick: a Memoir,” by Porochista Khakpour, is one of a few non-fiction biographies that detail a life of struggle following a diagnosis of Lyme disease, a tick-borne infectious disease that has varying degrees of complications.

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In “Sanctuary,” by Caryl Lix, the main character, Kenzie, is a teenage girl and a guard at Sanctuary, a high-tech prison in space. Everything she has ever learned about the prison comes from rules and regulations dictated by Omnisteller, “the most powerful corporation in the solar system.”

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Vice presidents hold a unique and important office, operating sometimes in the center of the action and sometimes on the sidelines. Forty-eight vice presidents have served the United States. Nine vice presidents were catapulted into the Oval Office during their vice presidency by the death o…

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Legos have changed in the 60 years since they hit toy shelves, but kids’ passion for the bricks remains strong. Celebrate Legos with “I’m Fun, Too!” a picture book any beloved blockhead will adore.

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Linda D. Dahl, author of the memoir “Tooth and Nail: the Making of a Female Fight Doctor,” introduces readers to an exceptional world. Dahl was an ENT doctor in an upscale New York office in Manhattan by day and a fight doctor by night.

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“Lady Be Good” is a funny story, a quick-paced read with great characters and some nice twists. It is a tale of romance, friendship and women becoming empowered.

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“Dopesick,” by journalist and author Beth Macy, is an eye-opener, a comprehensive and thoroughly researched book on the history, and reasons why we’re losing so many people to opioids, with crime running rampant as users steal to support their habit.

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“Fly Girls” is the exhilarating true story of five women willing to risk their lives for the sport they loved. It is a soaring addition to the recently compiled canon of books about trailblazing women who shattered or, at least, cracked the glass ceiling of historically male activities.

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I thoroughly enjoyed this book of fiction, the “Paris Metro.” It is a contemporary novel, taking place in the 21st century. The character development is perfect and the historical details are worth reading twice.

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Not many of us have reason to consider the border between the United States and Canada, the world's longest at over 5000 miles, if you include Alaska with the “lower 48.” This border has been explored, surveyed and defined by intrepid men, beginning as early as the American Revolution. Parts…

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Until the turn of the 20th century, the food choices available to most people in the United States were limited to bland staples such as wheat and potatoes. But then David Fairchild (1869-1954), an intrepid young botanist, began to change all that.

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With “The Book of Essie,” author Meghan Maclean Weir has written her first novel, a debut about fame, religion, families and cults. Those who remember the massacre at Waco involving the Branch Davidians, and readers who are fans of reality television involving large religious families, will …

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For those of you who enjoy the Warriors series by Erin Hunter, I would recommend reading “Riders of the Realm: Across the Dark Water” by Jennifer Lynn Alvarez.

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If you like aviation and its history, this is a great book. If you like the bygone era of flappers and Prohibition, this will be a fascinating read. If you like tales of adventure, danger and daring, this book will lure you in. If you like romance and a love triangle with a suicide—or a murd…

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“Sunburn,” recently released in paperback, is a great summer read set in the sand and sun along the eastern seaside. Laura Lippman’s sizzling suspense story kicks off with Polly Costello at the beach with her husband and young daughter, Jani. The family seems to be enjoying a relaxing week, …

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Monday Charles has gone missing. Vanished out of thin air. Not even her mother or sisters seem to care. So begins “Monday’s Not Coming,” by Tiffany D. Jackson.

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A memorandum from St. Joseph, Missouri to Sacramento, California can be distributed and read in mere seconds today due to current electronic technology. What a contrast to April 1860, when citizens found it remarkable that a letter made it cross-country between these same two points in less …

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In the company of a curly-topped sprite, imagination blends with what-to-expect-facts in “Fairy’s First Day of School,” a helpful honey of a read by Bridget Heos.

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“Bella Figura” is a fast read, a memoir about finding love and discovering oneself. Kamin Mohammadi, the author, had a prestigious job as a glossy magazine editor in London. Kamin was stressed out and unhappy. When she lost her job, she decided to accept a friend’s offer to stay in her apart…

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Local color abounds in “The Amazing Adventures of Aaron Broom,” a coming-of-age story set in Depression-era St. Louis told by Aaron, an innocent 12-year-old who “dectifies” to unravel a jewelry store crime.

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White House Social Secretaries, Lea Berman and Jeremy Bernard have planned state dinners, celebrity musical performances, Congressional picnics and other state occasions. Bernard filled the position for Barack and Michelle Obama; Berman for George and Laura Bush.

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With neon bright art and a zany storyline, author/illustrator Claire Evans scores with “The Three Little Superpigs.” The tale begins where the classic story ended, the furious wolf being outfoxed by the porcine three.

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“Eden Conquered,” by Joelle Charbonneau, is an amazing sequel to the popular young adult “Dividing Eden” series, leaving you wishing for more. Darkness is descending upon Eden, and only Carys or Andreus can stop it; the whole book is a race to see which one of them will succeed.

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Mia Tang and her family came to America from China in the book “Front Desk,” by Kelly Yang. They are very poor, so when a man named Mr. Yao posts a job for working in a hotel, they are the first to take it.

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Today we welcome a first review from Megan Barrett, the mom of three with a new baby due in January. Megan works part time, but with the “expectations of another little one” she will be staying home more and “has grown an interest in writing for fun and blogs.”

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The title of the “The Address,” by Fiona Davis, refers to the Dakota, an elegant residence in New York City near Central Park. Built in the late 1800s, it was home to artists, musicians and actors, families with recognizable names, and the very rich. (Today, the Dakota is famous for being th…

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Erling Kagge is a Norwegian lawyer, adventurer, publisher and author whose book “Silence In the Age of Noise” draws, in part, from his experiences in reaching the world’s three “poles”; the North Pole, the South Pole, and the summit of Mount Everest.

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Today we welcome a new reviewer to MO Books, Patricia Miller, a third-generation journalist who was first published at age 11 when her father, then-editor of the “Washington Missourian” ran her letter to the editor complaining about the newspaper's bias against girls selling the newspaper on…

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It feels surreal, as our country approaches the 242 anniversary of its freedom, to be celebrating the fact that our government is no longer pulling crying toddlers and infants away from their parents along the southern border.

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“A Reaper at the Gates,” by Sabaa Tahir, is a painstakingly wrought, action-filled addition to “An Ember in the Ashes” series. This book shook my foundations, with enough action to keep me reading non-stop.

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The historical fiction novel “Love and Ruin” centers on the tumultuous love story between Ernest Hemingway and his third wife Martha Gellhorn; it reads like a memoir. The story is told by Marty Gellhorn and follows her from her roots in St. Louis, Missouri, through her travels as a journalis…

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For all of you Percy Jackson fans out there, check out Roshani Chokshi’s book based on Hindu mythology, “Aru Shah and the End of Time.” It is an interesting read.

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