“Daniel’s Good Day” is a happy story with vibrant illustrations by Micha Archer about a little boy who’s going to see his grandmother. Daniel lives in a busy area and knows many in his neighborhood. Each person he meets on his walk tells him to “Have a good day.”

“A Wonderful Stroke of Luck,” by Ann Beattie, tells the life of Ben, an emotionally challenged man who can’t come to terms with his lot in life or the people from his past, haunting him throughout his adulthood.

“My Lovely Wife, ” by Samantha Downing, is a psychological thriller full of domestic suspense. It’s a story of family dynamics, marriage and its challenges, serial killers, and the effects the news media plays in our culture.

Before our first grandchild was born 17 years ago, my husband and I signed up for grandparenting classes at the hospital where our daughter was going to give birth. We left the class one evening with a meaty kernel of advice: “Keep your mouth shut.”

On a whim, Dani Shapiro spit into a cup and took a DNA test through Ancestry.com. Once the sample was sent, she didn’t think about it again. Several weeks later, the results arrived. Shapiro learned she had no biological connection to the man she thought was her father, so goes the premise o…

“The Tiger at Midnight,” by Swati Teerdhala, is a gorgeously written Indian- inspired tale full of secrets, drama and adventure.

“Ruse,” by Cindy Pon, is the enticing, adventurous sequel in the “Want” duology. The author once again releases an amazing book set in the scary world of future Taipei. (Spoiler alert: please don’t read this review if you haven’t read “Want.”)

“Little Faith,” by Nickola Butler, is a moving intergenerational novel about a Wisconsin family and the power and limitations of their faith. It is a story of family, community, friendship, love and forgiveness.

“The Day That Went Missing: A Family’s Story,” by Richard Beard, is a memoir describing a life lived after a younger brother’s death, but really it is so much more. The memoir is a look at how we all try to sweep the unpleasant occurrences in our lives under the rug and attempt to live unaffected.

On Earth Day not everything green, or yellow, is a welcome sight. Many will feel the main character’s pain in “Dandy,” the cover showing a crazed lion glaring at a dandelion erupting in his lawn, his daughter peeking out of his golden mane with a joy-filled expression.

“Here and Now and Then” is a time travel story by Mike Chen. Although it has some technical and scientific details it is still a quick read and a touching story.

April is poetry month. I’d advise swinging down the bridle path with “Pony Poems for Little Pony Lovers,” by Cari Meister — a collection of 16 rhyming poems, each featuring a unique tail-swishing beauty. Among the cuties are Stoney, a pinto, Princess a palomino and Nibbles, a buckskin that e…

A vision by a young man with a troubling past sets this investigative mystery in motion, and the suspense continues until “Desolation Mountain’s” conclusion. Although this is one of many books in a series about a former sheriff named Cork O’Connor, William Kent Krueger’s novel can be read as…

“A Cold Day in the Sun,” by Sara Biren, is a young adult romance that takes place in present time. It’s set in a small town in Minnesota and focuses on hockey, and the relationship between two players.

William Logan Bryant has written a charming and scientific book about the unlikely nonfiction topic of tree pruning. This acclaimed arborist explores woodland cutting from ancient times to the present. He centers his message on two pruning methods that have been used for thousands of years t…

“Borrowing Bunnies, A Surprising True Tale of Fostering Rabbits” is a standout nonfiction book about a subject many children might not be familiar with, or their parents either. Author Cynthia Lord narrates this charmer, explaining how she fosters bunnies, provides them with a safe, nurturin…

This heartwarming fast read by Rae Anne Thayne is the story of family dynamics and finding true love. The characters in “The Cliff House” are well developed, you feel like you know them personally and find yourself cheering them on.

“At the Wolf’s Table,” by Rosella Postorino, is based on the true story of Margot Wolk, who in 2013, when she was 96, told the world about her life as Adolf Hitler’s food taster. For 2 ½ years during World War II, she and 14 other women were picked up daily at their country homes in Gross-Pa…

Rania Abouzeid was accused of spying and forbidden by the Bashar al-Assad’s regime from entering Syria in 2011. However, that did not stop this award-winning journalist from reporting from Syria illegally for six years. Her fluent Arabic made it possible for her to blend in with the crowd an…

Winter is coming. And it’s not George R.R. Martin’s “A Game of Thrones.” Instead, it’s Jasper Ffordes first novel in five years, “Early Riser.” Until five years ago, Fforde had been releasing about one novel a year, mostly in his “Thursday Next” series and his young adult series, “Chronicles…

Eva Hagberg Fisher’s memoir of her life-threatening illness that occurred in 2013 when she was in her late 20s documents her surgeries and recovery from a suspected brain tumor. The narrative describes her journey, during which she learned to be a friend, accept friendship, develop compassio…

In “The Dragonfly Sea,” by Yvonne Adhiambo Owuor, the events of global politics are not just the background but the catalyst that drives the lives of individuals on the small island of Pate (pronounced pah-tay), off the coast of Kenya.

Deborah Lipstadt’s book “Antisemitism Here and Now,” completed in May 2018, has an unfortunately predictive opening sentence: “By the time this book appears there will have been new examples of antisemitism.”

Welcome to our newest reviewer, Kylie Phinney, a junior at Washington High School. Kylie enjoys “realistic fiction with a hint of romance, and psychology books.”

“Cherokee America” is a wonderfully told historical fiction story. Margaret Verble sets her novel in 1875, in the Cherokee Nation, Oklahoma Territory. The book is told from Cherokee America Singer’s point of view.

I have never investigated a crime scene nor have I worked the night shift as a police officer, but Joseph Knox made me feel as though I was deeply invested in such work with his novel about Officer Aidan Waits. “The Smiling Man,” a literary noir, is the story of how a crime is solved after a…

“My name is Amber Reynolds. There are three things you should know about me:

Stella Grant, the main character in “Five Feet Apart,” has CF, a deadly lung disease. Even with this pulling her down, Stella still keeps a happy face, her personal channel sending awareness out into the world. This page turner is by Rachel Lippincott, Mikki Daughtry, and Tobias Iaconis.

“Girls with Sharp Sticks,” by Suzanne Young, is a young adult novel that follows a group of teenage girls, specifically Philomena, while they uncover the ins and outs of their “prestigious education” at the mysterious Innovations Academy.

“Ways to Hide in Winter,” by Sarah St. Vincent, is a slow-burn of a story that draws you deeper in the more you read. Descriptions of the setting in the Blue Ridge Mountains in Pennsylvania are breathtaking—I felt like I could see my breath in front of me on a cold day while reading this boo…

“The Border” is the third book of a trilogy that author Don Winslow has devoted his writing time to for 20-years plus. The first book in the trilogy "The Power of the Dog,” was followed by "The Cartel." If these earlier books are as gripping and accurate as “The Border” they would be worth s…

I didn’t plan to read Evan Ratliff’s account of the crimes of Paul LeRoux, but after I read the prologue I couldn’t stop. “The Mastermind” is a mesmerizing story of a smart but damaged computer programmer who builds an international criminal network out of nothing but his own innovation and …

“The Very Impatient Caterpillar” is a zany book featuring a caterpillar with a character flaw. Ross Burach’s insect is short on patience but long on boisterous behavior.

Sandra Day O’Connor was born in El Paso, Texas and grew up on a remote cattle ranch in Arizona. In the era when women were expected to be homemakers, O’Connor set her sights on Stanford University. She graduated in 1952 near the top of her class, but in spite of her excellent education, no l…

This suspenseful mystery focuses on Charlie Cates, a journalist who has visions of missing children. The story begins with Charlie following her vision/dream about Alex Rocio, a missing 12-year-old boy.

Author Ursula K. Le Guin is one of my favorite authors and the latest subject in the “Last Interview” series of books. David Streitfeld edits and writes the introduction to several interviews conducted over Le Guin’s life, including the last interview before she passed away on January 22, 20…

Prepare for a wild ride with Peter Heller’s “The River,” a slim volume that sets your nerves on edge as the pages turn — and they fly in the gifted storyteller’s hands. Heller juxtaposes the beauty and harmony of nature with the horror of a “megafire,” and pure evil doled out by crazed men.

“The Only Woman in the Room,” by Marie Benedict, is a fascinating story of Hedy Lamarr, most famous for being a 1940s movie star. Because of recent publications and documentaries, many people know now that Lamarr also was an inventor of the scientific process of “frequency hopping” which was…

“The Red Address Book,” is a must read for anyone who has ever played cards or learned how to crochet under the watchful eyes of their Gran.

Today we welcome our first review from Lyllian Neuberger, a junior at Washington High School, and an avid reader. Some of Lyllian’s favorite books are “All the Bright Places,” by Jennifer Niven, “Looking for Alaska,” by John Green or any of the novels from the “Heroes of Olympus” series by R…

The 1959 publication of Strunk and White’s “Elements of Style,” a book “Time Magazine” called “one of the 100 best and most influential books written in English since 1923,” marked a watershed moment in American letters. For the first time a concise manual of English composition was availabl…

If you love movies and movie history, “The Wild Bunch, Sam Peckinpah, a Revolution in Hollywood, and the Making of a Legendary Film,” is your book. It is a well-researched, detailed account of the movie, “The Wild Bunch.” The book also offers a glimpse into 1968, the year the film released, …

Given the snowy winter we have had, I could not help picking up “The Illustrated History of the Snowman.” Bob Eckstein has written the definitive book on Frosty and friends, tracing their history back to the Dark Ages.

Reviewed by Debbie Bandy, who recently moved to the area after teaching English in Charleston, South Carolina for 25 years. She enjoys reading science fiction, fantasy, historical fiction and non-fiction, and books about travel.

We're always interested in hearing about news in our community. Let us know what's going on!